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kawan
04-29-2005, 08:42 PM
Hi,
A group of us had just finished learning the first segment (1st duan) of the Yang long form. Our instructor, when concluding the class, reminded us to keep the combat applications of the forms in mind when we practise in order to help qi move through the correct pathways.

While practicing the 1st duan repeatedly at home last night and imagining blocking and striking an imaginary foe in 'lou xi ao bu' (Brush Knee Twist Step), I get a tingling sensation of my striking palm. So exciting to finally feel something :)


Thanks.

stanton
04-29-2005, 09:28 PM
kawan,

it just means you practiced sufficiently and you should keep doing so. Imaging is good but without semblance of contact, nothingis gained. Better to learn the form first and do it properly.

kawan
05-01-2005, 01:54 AM
Originally posted by stanton
Imaging is good but without semblance of contact, nothingis gained. Better to learn the form first and do it properly.

Hi Stanton,
By contact, did you mean sparring?

stanton
05-01-2005, 05:39 PM
Contact is orientation and sensitivity training as in tuishou.
When you have learnt the basic elements of tuishou (rolling hands/aka push hands) then progress to shuaijiao/qi'na, if interested.

It is impossible to keep combat application in mind when you haven't learnt it through tuishou and then actual postuer awareness! The qi moving through correct pathways is a new one for me since nothing goes against the laws of anatomy and physiology unless there is sickness and ill health.

just a thought.

soraya
05-01-2005, 06:26 PM
Before you go into contact it is important to develop stable rooting and a reasonable understanding of the principles such as good posture, focus, relaxation, coordination, internalization etc. You may learn basics of qin nar and shuaijao although all the techniques are already incorporated within the form. Working on your mind and keeping your qi from being uprooted, ask your teacher what I mean by this, is most important. Visualizing martial art application during form practice is the basic essential content of Tai Chi instruction.

Movements are becoming more accurate and purposeful, your mind develops a stronger determination and your whole form becomes more foucsed. Even If your intention is not becoming a martial artist, this is extremely crucial to develop internal strength which can heal as well as kill.

When you are unable to shift weight and know the difference between substantial and insubstantial, your balance will be weak. Under pressure of tuishou and shan shou, your balance will become even weaker and you will start utilizing brute muscle force

Melanie
05-02-2005, 01:46 AM
Originally posted by stanton


It is impossible to keep combat application in mind when you haven't learnt it through tuishou and then actual postuer awareness! The qi moving through correct pathways is a new one for me since nothing goes against the laws of anatomy and physiology unless there is sickness and ill health.

just a thought.

I used to think like that but my teacher taught me something better. Tuishou without form is useless but there is no way that you skip the form and qi gong. When you look at the form you will notice that every movement is based on proper body mechanics. This means that when you proceed against natural anatomy or physiology like unbalanced stances, wrong angles and moves, you will feel weak. Your body communicates to you by feeling unwell that your qi hasn't moved along the right pathways.

BillT
05-02-2005, 12:39 PM
Kawan- I would like to think you have arrived at the sensation you are after. The "best" form work I do primarily produces a sensation in my hands. It only occurs when everything is moving in a relaxed, but coordinated way. I think you can get the same sensation out of non-martial qiqong, but if you have the postures of the Yang form right, that sensation and the position is associated with a variety of effective applications, as well as the health benefits of the training.

In Xingyi, the notion of the "internal" is a bit different than in Tai Chi, but tied to your title, "Martial Intent and Qi."

You learning to cultivate Qi in a reservoir around the groin/lower abdomen (not just the Dantian); this is released by the "intent", not a thought out plan but more of a releasing decision. From there, the Qi flows mostly in a rising and falling pattern, like a big tire rolling forward to the target, through the target. The more advanced and longer you have trained, the more easily (and effectively) that qi flow is, and the more problem it creates for the recipient. Bill

kawan
05-03-2005, 11:04 AM
Hi All,
Thanks for the replies and advice.

erwins
05-07-2005, 08:41 PM
Kawan,

When I do the following things before practicing my form, I usually feel the qi in my hands/arms and around my head and shoulders.

1) good warmup and stretching around 10 - 15 minutes.
2) good focused meditation. I find standing closing my eyes, relaxing and quieting mind, and taking 20 - 30 slow deep longs breaths helps facilitate this
3) playing the form in a relaxed, but accurate manner.

I don't always get to do all 3 things and sometimes just start doing the form. That's when all I really get is a physical workout. My mind and spirit are not there, and of course, no qi.

Erwin