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carolinew
08-29-2004, 09:51 AM
I know many forum users do a variety of martial arts, and some do yoga, but as a complement to tai chi and qi gong what else do you do, and how well does it compliment your tai chi?

I try to carry my tai chi practice into other things, it is amazing how much it helps my balance when travelling, and because I now sit better when I eat, my digestion has improved so I feel less clogged up.

To help my training make sense I research as much as I can, and look at other forms to see how they compare. I also do meditation which is an enhancement. Mostly I do tai chi as it helps in other areas.

Shark
08-29-2004, 02:05 PM
i like 5 animal frolics by T.K. Shi,a stationary streching type excercise that starts everything circulating after warmups;and 18 buddha hands;
oh and baduanjin but i don't do all of the excercises,just the ones i like

soraya
08-29-2004, 11:25 PM
Nearly everything complements TC. FEncing, weight lifting, tennis, all types of martial arts, many of my good students are yogis and pilatis, activities like cooking, mowing lane....etc....etc

soraya
08-29-2004, 11:36 PM
I am working on a program"Nordic walking with TC principles", apart from the fact that principles of relaxation, mind-cleansing, relax shoulders, elbow, wrists, back straight are important guiding principles of nordic walking. NW is walking with poles originally designed as a summer exercise for cross-country skiers in Scandivian countries. Please view Cooper Institute Dallas who performed clinical studies on this. Studies in Finland has shown this to be very helpful for tendinitis. My epiconylitis was first relieved by acupuncture by Paul Lam, then i broke it up because of my travelling and continued with Tai Chi. Now it has improved about 85% by Nordic walking.

Greyphantom
08-30-2004, 03:07 AM
Weight lifting (which is also benefitted from Taiji) and meditation...

stanton
08-30-2004, 12:12 PM
GP,

I am not sure but I usually recommend weight lifting on one day and taijiquan the next. Weight lifting and taijiquan work in opposite directions since the former puts a pressure load to the heart, which MAY not be good unless one is in shape per MDs criteria. Obviously anyone can weight lift.

To be conservative I usually do not recommend. It is also well known that healthy adults and seniors who do, can enjoy a complementary routine but one separate days.

BillT
08-30-2004, 06:25 PM
I train weights on a Monday-Wednesday-Friday schedule, ride a stationary bike Tuesday and Saturday, and use a "Nordic Trac" ski simulator Thursday and Sunday. It seems definitely counterproductive to train any of these immediately prior to practicing Tai Chi, as it it hard to achieve a relaxed, focused state for me when sore or exhausted from one of my other workouts. My Tai Chi is usually done as a shorter routine in the morning and a longer routine late afternoon right after work, while the others generally come after that. I think weight training has better potential to stress and therefore build bone mass in a controlled fashion, while I do the aerobic workouts with a distant fantasy of returning to competition (or perhaps just out of vanity). Bill

Greyphantom
08-31-2004, 12:47 AM
Originally posted by stanton
GP,

I am not sure but I usually recommend weight lifting on one day and taijiquan the next. Weight lifting and taijiquan work in opposite directions since the former puts a pressure load to the heart, which MAY not be good unless one is in shape per MDs criteria. Obviously anyone can weight lift.

To be conservative I usually do not recommend. It is also well known that healthy adults and seniors who do, can enjoy a complementary routine but one separate days.

I work to a 3 day a week lifting schedule as Bill does... I practice taiji every day though... I have been weightlifting (with a view to attaining more muscle mass) for about 15 years, with two years before that for mainly fitness... I agree that weightlifting stimulates the heart and indeed heavy lifting can put stress on pretty much the whole body but I consider my self to be in pretty good shape... also I have found that taiji helps with maintaining a relaxed tension when lifting... (sort of hard to explain) and also helps with muscle soreness/lactic acid build up... I dont train with weights and practice taiji concurrently but with quite a big gap between them... ie taiji is usually in the morning at 6am then weights about 13.30 mon-wed-fri... I have also found that my bodybuilding has given me a good knowledge of my body and how it works and this has helped with my taiji practice... I do agree completely that if somebody has not been working out and is not in the best shape physically they need to consult a doc or to take it very easy and learn the form first...
Its sort of like taiji really... you need to learn the form then look into the exercise and make sure that your performance of the movement is correct and then refine it and get that mind muscle link going.. funnily enough there is an internal aspect to bodybuilding... something which I have only really discovered since taking up taiji... there is also a yin/yang in every movement... how profound...

soraya
08-31-2004, 01:38 AM
I agree with Bill and Grey. weight-lifting always had these internal aspects. If you put too much load to the heart it means that you lift with brute force. Not the right thing to do.REmember 4 ounces deflect 100 lbs? This also applies for weight lifting. Grey, due to TC you discover this but it has always been a basic essential principle of weight lifting. I have been very lucky to teach TC in a gym and work with so many other professionals. It only gave me more insight to TC and how everything is interwoven.

The other point is soccer:
If you kick straight into the goal with brute fore,without any consideration to your mates you will lose your game straight away. Many sentivity techniques like passing and receiving while using more technique than strength, walking and stalking around the ball(remember stalking around the prey and cathing in TC?) are important. Apart from the more social aspect like mateship and team attitude.

soraya
08-31-2004, 01:49 AM
just to add that it is recommendable to give the muscles and the heart a little break of 2 days depending on intensity and previous stamina and fitness condition. If the muscles hurt(micro injuries) than give a longer rest because your tC will grow worse, i.e. qi will not flow. If it just twitches a bit it means that your muscles have worked and there will be no objection. In due time one will develop the right feel for their body, what it can do and what it can't. This also applies for tC

Shark
08-31-2004, 04:40 AM
wholehearted support for soraya's response take at least 2 days between weight lifting as this has a tendancy to tighten up the muscles and impede chi flow
i had been lifting weights all my life (did the 4hr workouts a lot when was younger);now at 50 just use dumbells to keep some upper
body strength as my t.c. teacher advised.
i built myself up HUGE by breathing IN while pushing or pulling a weight for years;contrary to what everyone tells you to do;this brings oxygen to the muscles making them build faster and is no more risky;anyone who's done this knows what i'm talking about;others will just remain unconvinced

carolinew
08-31-2004, 11:25 AM
Glad I started this. I had never heard of Nordic Walking, but everyone seems to do a nice variety of things.

steven cooper
09-09-2004, 06:13 AM
The 8 baduanjin exercises are a great complement to taiji. I try to practice 1-2 hours of chen taiji quan every morning with 20-30 mins of baduanjin in the evenings. Also post standing, or zhang zhuang is very valuable and nearly every chinese mater will tell you that zhang zhuang is necessary to develop the flow of chi through the body. Can be difficult depending on the environment that you find yourself in, though.

carolinew
09-11-2004, 11:50 AM
I have just been to see The Shaolin Minks Wheel of Life Show. It has inspired me to bigger and better things. If any one else gets a chance to see it do so. It is another way of looking at Tai Chi training, and the brochure we bought informs us that Tai Chi is used as a prelude/warm up to their Kung Fu!

Shark
09-11-2004, 07:12 PM
don't be taken in by carnavals and side shows.
true martial art is not of these things

carolinew
09-12-2004, 01:30 AM
All I will say is see the show before passing judgement. These guys do some amazing things that are not normally seen in a side show or a carnival! I wish I was that flexible.

Melanie
09-14-2004, 11:30 AM
Our family also practices Wing Chun and pencak silat, a martial art with origins in Indonesia(North Sumatra) and Malaysia

stanton
09-17-2004, 09:08 AM
melanie,

I see similarities between penjat silat, kali and 2 sectional staff (for lack of better description) in mechanics and usage. function and use is easier than most systems.

just a tort.