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kawan
11-23-2004, 10:16 AM
Hi,
Following Soraya's post on walking with Tai Chi principles, I found a description of Tai Chi walking. Hope this is helpful to anyone who is curious.




Tai Chi Walking

1. From the starting position, move the right leg forward and slightly outward. Place your right heel only onto the ground. Without shifting your balance leave your body weight in the left leg.

2. Gradually shift your body weight into the right leg, letting the sole of the right foot contact the ground. with the right knee slightly bent (the knee no further forward than the toes) begin to straighten the left leg.

3. Slowly begin to raise your left heel off the ground. Move your left foot (lift the foot, do not drag it) to a position beside your right foot. Keep the left heel up.

4. Move the left leg forward and slightly outward. Place your left heel only onto the ground. Without shifting your balance leave your body weight in the right leg.

5. Gradually shift your body weight into the left leg, letting the sole of the left foot contact the ground. With the left knee slightly bent (the knee no further forward than the toes) begin to straighten the right leg.

6. Slowly begin to raise your right heel off the ground. Move your right foot (lift the foot, do not drag it) to a position beside your left foot. Keep the right heel up.

7. Step forward with your right foot again to continue walking.

Note
When walking backward it is the toes of your foot that make first contact with the ground.


The Tai Chi Turn

1. Begin to step forward with your right foot but keep your body weight in the left leg.

2. Pivot the right heel inward at an angle of forty- five degrees.

3.Transfer your body weight into your right leg. At the same time twist your hips anti-clockwise to follow the direction of the right foot.

4. Pivot the left heel outward through one-hundred and eighty degrees.

5. Turn your body even further so that you are facing the way you came.

6. Transfer your body weight into your left leg and continue walking.

Melanie
11-23-2004, 05:57 PM
Kawan my friend

Tx so much for the interesting info. When I'm not mistaken Paul has this info on his video"Tai Chi for beginners" which are the 1st 6 movements of 24 forms. A few qi gong exercises are shown. The "Tai Chi walk" is Yang style and practice what you have just described.

Paul's video Tai Chi for Diabetes contains the Sun Walk which he describes as"qi gong for diabetes". Interesting not only for diabetics

stanton
11-23-2004, 06:27 PM
kawan,

there really is no such thing but there have been individuals who have developed individual 'gong' methods to supplement a specific style of Taiji Walk(ing) utilizing similar as you described.

Check out a site of (if you haven't already) of Ted Knecht where his teacher has a similar type of Yang style mechanics that has shown some benefit. I will link if possible.

kawan
11-23-2004, 07:57 PM
Hi Melanie,
Thanks for the information. I've not had the chance to see any of Dr Lam's videos yet. I've recommended them to our library though.

Hi Stanton,
It would not be easy to Tai Chi walk to the office :)

Thanks for the lead to Ted Knecht. I'll try to search for his site.

Shark
11-23-2004, 10:23 PM
yeah,the "t'ai chi walk" is actually a beginning excercise given to t'ai chi students to teach them how to move (step) while opening and closing the kwa etc.
this is very important learning excercise and teaching tool.(The good teachers know about this routine, i have taught it myself and learned it from my first two teachers);
Robert Chuckrow (think i may have mentioned before) has a book out about walking for excercise,as you would normally walk,using TC principles.
may be available on amazon;check it out!

kawan
11-24-2004, 09:50 PM
Originally posted by Shark
i have taught it myself and learned it from my first two teachers);

Hi Shark,
Do you need to do any "opening move" before the walk and "closing move" after the walk?

What do you do with your hands when doing this walk? Do you just keep them loosely by your sides?

Thanks.

Shark
11-24-2004, 10:10 PM
one of the main purposes of the excercise is to help the student feel the opening and closing of the kua region (inguinal crease in front of the hips),which boosts health,immune system by helping to produce synovial (joint) fluid.
the opening movement would depend on whether you want to initiate from a left or right bow stance.(i take it for granted that you know that the lead leg is what determines left or right in a bow stance ne ce pas?)
i usually start w/left bow
turn right and shift weight to the back leg opening up the left kua,turning out the left foot,so that the left kua is wide open and making sure the student feels the right kua squeezing shut;finish up where i started in a left bow stance.
i prefer to have the hands placed lightly on the hips so they can follow the turns;voila,facile hein?

kawan
11-25-2004, 08:29 AM
Originally posted by Shark
ne ce pas?)

turns;voila,facile hein?

Hi Shark,
Thanks.

What do the above phrases mean?

Melanie
11-25-2004, 05:43 PM
Kawan

Don't worry, yu haven't missed any important Tai Chi terminology. N'est-ce pas? is French and means"isn't it? The word turn just happened to come in front, Voila means "that's it, facile means easy. So, that's it, easy, isn't it?. By the way ami means kawan in French

Shark
11-25-2004, 09:20 PM
sorry about the french;thanks for update & translation melanie,that's nice to know;kawan definitely has friends here

Marc Heyvaert
11-26-2004, 03:47 AM
Hello,

In my classes I do a lot of basic TJQ walking. But more as it is done in the form, i.e. with the typical 'rocking backward and forward motion' of the modern yang style. The type of slow walking that you describe is something that I do sometimes as a meditation exercise, so really very slowly. (Isn't this part of Zen practice too?)

As you describe turning in taiji, I would like to post my description as well. It is slightly different.

Originally posted by kawan
The Tai Chi Turn

1. Begin to step forward with your right foot but keep your body weight in the left leg.

2. Pivot the right heel inward at an angle of forty- five degrees.

3.Transfer your body weight into your right leg. At the same time twist your hips anti-clockwise to follow the direction of the right foot.

4. Pivot the left heel outward through one-hundred and eighty degrees.

5. Turn your body even further so that you are facing the way you came.

6. Transfer your body weight into your left leg and continue walking.

My starting point is the right bow-stance facing west.

1. Sit back into your left leg and lift the toes of your right foot, turn the right foot in, pivoting on the right heel until your foot points due south.

2. Shift your body weigth back into your right leg while you turn until your body faces south-east. While you turn, you lift your left heel off the ground so that your left foot pivots also to the south-east. At that moment there is no weight in your left leg, you are 'sitting' into your right leg.

3. Lift your left leg, turn so that your body faces east, step out (so to the east but also out so that your stance will be shoulder width) into a left bow stance. (Heel touches first, the sole, then shift the weight and at the end you turn the right foot in so that it points to the south-east).

I turn the right foot in, pivoting on the heel. That is also the way that I teach it to beginners. Pusshing the heel out is something that I dissaprove of. If this is worth a thread I'm willing to discuss this further :)

Marc

kawan
11-27-2004, 09:35 PM
Hi Melanie,
Thanks for the help with the French :)

kawan
11-27-2004, 09:44 PM
Originally posted by Marc Heyvaert
I would like to post my description as well. It is slightly different.


Marc

Hi Marc,
Thanks for giving us an alternative turning method.

Thanks.