#1  
Old 07-15-2004, 06:53 PM
Georgi
 
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Chinese words

Hello,

I would like to ask the instructors , and everyone that knows, to put some common chinese words used in tai chi
I can recall some words like:
laojia
zhanzhuang
yangshenggong
zhong

some words
tao
dao
chuan
tai

and probably a lot more can be put here.

I know that most words have different meanings and not just translations but still if you can help us a little I'm sure everyone will be thankfull.

It will be very useful for us newbies to learn some chinese words and be able to understaind. In some posts you put in 2-3 words what the chinese word means but maybe it will be easier to find the word in one forum.


Thank You

Georgi
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  #2  
Old 07-15-2004, 07:08 PM
Shark
 
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are you asking for english translations of these words?
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  #3  
Old 07-15-2004, 07:28 PM
Georgi
 
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Eanglish will be the most usefull translation.

My question is not to get the translation of these exact words (i can find them on the web) but words in general that are used in practices (positions, stances, "get ready" for example, "stop", "left", "right"...

When I was practicing Taekwondo the practice had no korean teachers but 90% of the speaking(commands if you prefer) was in korean.
Almost the same on my Wing Chun practices.
things like: wu sao, bong sao ...

Thank You
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  #4  
Old 07-15-2004, 11:40 PM
Greyphantom
 
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I think that tao and dao are the same word with different spellings based on different methods of romanacising words... means the way does it not...??

Laojia means old frame in reference to Chen style,

Chuan I believe means boxing but probably other things too...

Tai means something like grand...

but my understanding of Chinese is very limited so I could be mistaken...
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  #5  
Old 07-16-2004, 12:51 AM
soraya soraya is offline
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translation?

zhan zhuang = post standing or the "standing pilar" intended to cleanse the mind hence relax. Also to increase and merge body awareness esp. joints are energy gates
yangsheng= character roughly translated
gong= skill obstained after diligent practice
tai chi is the wade-giles spellling which is now widely replaced by pinyin or"taiji". This means "supreme ultimate" or balance of yin yang
chuan = fist
tai chi chuan = a martial art means fist or boxing skill based on supreme ultimate
dao or tao, i think tao is mandarin, ask Paul Lam means"the path"

laojia is the old fram of Chen style, the original which was taught to Yang Lu Chan and the basis of Yang style. Movements are simple, not double twisting, less stamping, turning, jumping, softer
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  #6  
Old 07-16-2004, 07:09 AM
stanton stanton is offline
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Personally the character shows more than the actual word.
The character for qigong reflects a pot under fire cooking/warming something, some work in processs of being accomplished.

quan=chuan (fist)
taijiquan=tai chi chuan

tao=dao=dao. there is also the tone that determines where the accentuation is. Dao means path or way with one tone but there is dao (different tone) that means broadsword
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  #7  
Old 07-16-2004, 07:09 PM
Shark
 
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the subtleties of the Chinese language are not easily represented in English tho stanton and soraya will surely lead you down the right path.T'ai Chi means"Supreme Ultimate" but that does not refer to it's rank among other martial arts;that would be more of a Western concept.
the real meaning is closer to "forever transforming or changing"
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  #8  
Old 07-17-2004, 01:27 AM
soraya soraya is offline
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supreme ultimate

Interesting, i didn't realize"supreme ultimate" may lead to misunderstanding. In fact many Western practitioners consider TC as being superior due to this mis-translation. I do understand it as an ultimate state of yin and yang, resulting from forever transforming or changing, the end will always be balance
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  #9  
Old 07-17-2004, 01:29 AM
soraya soraya is offline
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perpetuum mobile

Closer translation would be perpetuum mobile but i think this lacks the balance yin/yang concept. My teacher once told me that every TC consisted of hard and soft or yin/yang, otherwise you could call it: yin chi(his irony or joke)
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  #10  
Old 07-17-2004, 05:45 AM
Shark
 
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perpetuum mobile hmmmmm...perpetually moving,contantly in motion.....VERY good
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